Time Predictions

This is the fifth volume in the Simula SpringerBriefs series and helps us to understand and avoid unrealistic time predictions in both professional and personal life.

The Simula SpringerBriefs on Computing aims to provide introductions to select areas of research in computing. Each volume aims to provide an introduction to, and overview over, research fields that can otherwise be inaccessable. This is the fifth volume in this series.

Time Predictions: Understanding and Avoiding Unrealism in Project Planning and Everyday Life by Torleif Halkjelsvik and Magne Jørgensen is directed towards readers interested in achieving more realistic time predictions in their professional and personal lives. Large portions of the book are targeted towards professions that wish to achieve better time predictions, such as project managers, graphic designers, architects, engineers, film producers, consultants, and software developers, as well as others that would benefit from realistic time usage predictions. The book is also beneficial to those with a more general interest in judgment and decision-making, or who would like to improve their ability to predict and plan ahead in daily life.

Open access

Time Predictions is now available for download. As with all the Simula SpringerBriefs on Computing, this volume is open access under a CC BY 4.0 license and was published by SpringerOpen.

About the authors

Professor Magne Jørgensen is a Chief Research Scientist at the Centre for Digital Engineering (Simula@OsloMet) as well as a professor at the Department of Informatics at the University of Oslo. He holds a PhD in Software Engineering from the University of Oslo, and his experience in research and IT management reaches back to 1995. Jørgensen’s research interests include IT management, software engineering, human judgment, cost estimation, and risk management.

Torleif Halkjelsvik works as a research professor (seniorforsker) at the Norwegian Institute of Public Health and as an adjunct research scientist at Centre for Digital Engineering (Simula@OsloMet). Halkjelsvik has a background in social psychology (MSc from Norwegian University of Science and Technology) and judgment and decision-making (PhD from University of Oslo). He is interested in the determinants of people's behaviors and decisions in contexts ranging from project management to addictive behaviors.